Sunday, August 14, 2011

Shuttleworth Airshow

My reward for getting the yardwork done.  Taking the afternoon to go to the Shuttleworth Airshow.
I visited the collection back in January http://brewersnotes.blogspot.com/2011/01/shuttleworth-collection.html (it's my 2nd most popular post).
What's interesting about the Shuttleworth collection airshow is that because it contains some of the oldest aircraft in the world, they start much later that normal shows so that the Edwardian aircraft can fly in the still evening air (4-8:30 pm).
Overcast and late, the pictures suck.

1931 Desoutter Air Taxi

The mighty Feisler Storch flew all day taking people on rides.  The plane can take off or land in a back yard.  A Storch rescued Mussolini by landing and then taking off again from a ski resort in Italy after the dictator was overthrown.  

Hawker Tomtit.

The Blackburn B2 flew an aerobatic routine that ended early.

The Hawker Hind represents the end of greatest era in biplane manufacturing.  Hard to believe that it and it's siblings developed into the Hawker Hurricane.

The Hawker Sea Hurricane, 1 of 300 modified for use aboard Merchantmen ships for convoy defense.  1 of 50 Mark 1's modified without an arrestor hook.  I've never seen a Hurricane look so fast.

Polikarpov PO-2 pre-war traininer.

The Se-5 is one of my least favorite aircraft due largely to the square radiator that ruins the look of the nose.  Having seen it fly, I might have to change my ill-conceived opinion.  The big V-8 on the front purrs.

The Sopwith Pup.

Sopwith triplane, Dixie II.  There is only one.

A couple of the collections 20-odd bikes.  Yes, I wore my BSA shirt.  No, they didn't ask me to participate.

Again, the de Havilland DH-88 Comet.  Unfortunately it's in one of the worst positions in the hangar possible.  There is simply no way of getting a good picture of it.  It last flew in 1993 :(

At an airshow over here, even the fly-ins are cool.  This de Havilland Chipmunk was pressed into ride-giving service when the Tiger Moth couldn't go back up.  The pilot didn't seem to mind.

Comper Swift, 1932 air racer.  Suprisingly nimble in the air and fun to watch.  Undoubtedly a handful as well.

The Desoutter Air Taxi, Parnell Elf, de Havilland DH51 in a 3-ship flyby.  The flew a couple of laps in formation with the Swift, not an easy task.

This Miles Gemini put on a nice show with the pilot racking it around the trees, and into chandells all at a very low level. 

Miles Falcon and Magister in formation.

Percival Piston Provost put on an aerobatic routine.

Ugly on the ground, elegant in the air.

The Avro Tudor, Hawker Tomtit and Polikarpov in formation illustrating pre-war training aircraft.

The Blackburn B2 began an aerobatic routine but was cut short.  When the plane began trailing black smoke the tower fired a flare into the air to signal the pilot to land.  Down safe and sound, I'm sure she'll be back up in no time.

The one and only Sopwith Triplane.  Believe it or not, the Fokker copied this design for the more famous Dr-1, not the oher way around.

Vintage Rhonsperber glider.

1923 English Electric Wren heading up for a glide.

Aso in the ugly on the ground, elegant in the air category.  The Gloster Gladiator put on a great show chasing the "Hun" in teh Storch around.  Very powerful and very quiet compared to a Stearman.

Evolution of Hawker.  The 1935 Hind and the 1941 Hurricane.

The Hind safely down with the Hurricane providing top cover.

The collections 1911 Avro Triplane replica.  A 40 year old replica of a 100 year old design!  The light's getting really low!

The Bristol Box Kite is also a replica from "Those Magnificent Men and Their Flying Machines".  The original borrowed heavily from Farman (French) and Curtiss (US).  Another 40 year old copy of a 101 year old design.

Piloting skill was on display this evening.  In the 1910's and 20's it was not unusual for each flight to end in a controlled crash.  Planes would then be repaired, rebuilt and flown again.  Several of them took laps around the field instead of the standard "hop" down the runway.
Once he got a little altitude, you couldn't get this pilot down.  He subscribes to the addage; "take a lot of fuel so you only have to crash once."

Triplane chasing the Boxkite over the Chipmunk.

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