Saturday, January 8, 2011

Warwick

Monday was a bank holiday and the day Gena went back home.  After boozing it up all night with certain unamed persons, we woke up around 5:00 a.m. to drive the hour and a half to the airport.  A very tearful goodbye (probably due to exhaustion from our 10-day German bender), and then back to the hotel for some sleep.  For me the evening ended with Tron Legacy in 3D, mexican food and bed early.  For Gena it was 8 hours longer including a flight that chased the sun.

Tuesday, the partial solar eclipse in Milton Keynes.  Unfortunately the high clouds and lack of a polarizing filter resulted in this instead of the "devil horns" folks saw in the North.


Tuesday through Friday were pretty uneventfull although I received a very warm welcome by one of our customers when I had to fill in Friday.

Saturday morning I drove to Warwick (worrik), the county seat of Warwickshire in the Cotswolds.  Warwick is East of Coventry, which I visited on my first weekend when I took a train going in the wrong direction. 
Walking through the Eastgate headed for some breakfast.



 Fortified with a "Warwickshire fry up" (egg, sausage, bacon, mushrooms, tomato's, beans and toast) it was time to see England's "Greatest Medievel Castle"!
Originally built in 1068 by.... William the Conqueror.  That dude made his mark!
In 1088 it was given to / taken by the Earl of Warwick who comes off as a real power hungry prick.  Think of Dick Cheney pissing in the presidents ear.
Partially rebuilt in the 12th Century it is most notable for housing the imprisoned King Edward the IV (who is the tallest monarch to date).

The country house.

I was thinking of going with a similar motif in our bar room, no?


The Rouge room.  Is it me or does every painting of a royal look like the Marquis de Sade?

Tapestries hung in the guest beadroom depict the castle gardens and were 100 years old when they were put up in anticipation of Queen Elizabeth's (I) visit.  2011 - 1572 + 100 = they're old

The dining hall done up as it was for a visit by HM Queen Elizabeth (II).

The Southern grounds were once owned and used by the Knights Templar.

Here's the Brewer weight loss method:
First, Eat only meat, carbs, gravy and beer (oh, and a multivitamin and fish oil to slow deaths enevitable march).
Second, inadvertantly park in the lot farthest away from whatever attraction you're going to see.
Third, climb every fucking set of steps in England. 
Long way down.
Tougher climb up.


View from the top of the Guy's tower.  Yeah, it makes me a little nauseus too.

South-Eastern view of Ceasar's tower, the grounds and the river Avon from the walk.

Looking down at the barbican from Guy's tower. 

Remains of a 12th century bridge over the river. 

I'll say it; another cock in England.

This area is the second most poular tourist destination in England.  Stratford-Upon-Avon, Shakespere's birth and final resting place is only 6 miles away.  In hindsight this may have been a mistake. I couldn't care less about the Bard.  I'm going to have to find something with teeth or I'll be driving tomorrow.

Now I'll let you go as there's an 8-year old who keeps knocking on my door.  "Someone's going to get punched in the face!"

3 comments:

  1. Simply awesome pics man. The age of those places really puts in perspective how young "the colonies" really are over here.

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  2. You're not kidding, that point comes up every day. I'm sitting in a moder mfg. plant making carbon fiber and nomex per-lams. On the other side of the fence is the village of Duxford which is at least 300 years old. I'm not talking about castles or ruins, I'm talking about the places you go to eat and sleep.

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  3. That is super cool I don't care who you are.

    You should do a post on what you actually are doing over there for work, for those of us that don't know. I wear FR & nomex clothes at work, maybe the same thing?

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